Scaling History

Is it possible for the scale of a part to maintain its history?

What I’m observing right now - you have a part, say at 100%. You scale that part up to 110%. If you go back and attempt to scale the part a second time, it now says it’s 100%, but it’s really 10% larger than the original size.

Is there somewhere you can find the original scale percentage of the part? Or would it be possible to include the part’s scaling history somewhere?

Reason I ask is I’m using Shapr3D to scale various cosplay components, and it would be very useful to be able to see what the scale of the part is with respect to its original scale, but that information seems to be lost once the scaling operation is completed.

Thanks in advance for any help!

Sean

Ditto on this request. I just came on here to post this feature request as well. I found the same issue with scale. When prototyping I’m frequently scaling and having it scale then become the new 100% is arduous at the moment. I need to remember and then undo the operation so I can make other copies.

A command history or specifically a scale history please?

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Hi,

@chaunce322: to keep track of the original scale, I would rename the scaled body to append the scaling factor at the end of the name (eg Body 01-140%). Would it work for you?

@Willemb: have you considered creating a scaled copy using the + icon? This way, you would keep the original body unchanged.

@Shapr: it would be great to be able to add note or comment to body and sketch (in the item manager for instance), so we could note this kind of information as well as material’s properties or any other useful piece of information, or just not to forget modifications to be done for the next version, etc. Appending info at the end of the name works for me only when informations are short.

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Thank you for the suggestion! I have a few work-arounds I’ve employed, and this is another good one.

I was just asking if Shapr3D would consider adding this functionality in a future release as the work-arounds are all pretty clunky…

Sean